Study After Bielen No. 2

Hello everyone, I hope your week is going well. I’m still feeling out of sorts with the unusual weather we are having in the Pacific Northwest. I know It goes without saying, that it could always be worse. Nevertheless, I hope weather has been more pleasant where you are.

I decided to do another Bielen study and I probably will until I feel I’ve done enough for a while. I know it probably would take a great while before I can feel some sort of mastery of his style and technique 😆.

IMG_4604Study After Bielen No.2, Oil on Birch Panel, 6″x6″

I don’t know about you but I have always felt that the colour orange is so cheerful. I guess that’s why I decided on painting orange flowers; it brightens up the wintry days we’ve been having lately. I’m still trying to get used to palette knife painting imparting impasto texture. I normally use a thinner application of paint leaving minimal brush strokes. But I do like the instant colour payoff you get with the knife.

I don’t know if you can see it in this picture, but one of the things I’m happy with is the subtle shade differences in the background. The white of the background was painted with a warmer white on the left and a cooler shade of white on the right. I love subtle effects of the light in all paintings. I also really like the reflective light casting orange on the bottom left. The patchy texture of the background is interesting and I like the overall looseness of the painting.

I don’t know exactly why I’m trying to paint out of character other than just trying something different and learning new techniques. It feels like I’m looking for something but I don’t know what. Hopefully, it’ll dawn on me one day. Meanwhile, I find that studying a work of a favorite artist is a great way to really appreciate their work.

I hope you like the painting, thanks for visiting,

Jeannette

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Traditional painting in “Experiments” series

Hi everyone, below is a study in the “Experiments” series:
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I decided to use the traditional painting method of glazing with acrylic paint. The study features a basic sphere rendered by building-up transparent layers. I wanted to see what it would look like with a treatment of modern acrylic medium on top of it.

Here is a detail of the tonal values rendered on the sphere using the glazing technique. The good thing about glazing with acrylics is how fast it dries. You can get many thin layers down in a day. Whereas, in traditional oil painting, you’re lucky if you can get one layer done:
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I really like the rough texture of the burnt umber:
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I like the way the rough texture wraps around the sides of the painting. It makes the image more congruous as a whole:
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Here is another detail:
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Thanks for stopping by. I hope you’re enjoying the fall weather and it’s colours.

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Oil painting study: “acrylic orange”

A while back, I was experimenting with paint. I loved the look of oil paint but hated the smell of it. My limited exposure to oils was when I was in high school (a very long time ago), I think the brand was Grumbacher. It was the traditional type of paint that came in a tube, made with linseed oil and you needed solvents to modify and clean it up. It turned me off of oils completely.

Now we have many more options: some oils are water miscible, some are made with safflower oil and some are made with walnut oil like M. Graham. I can attest to M. Graham having no offensive odour at all. Suddenly, there are opportunities for working in oil. If any of you had the same experience, rejoice!

Below is a small study I did with acrylics to emulate an oil painting. It does not have varnish on it yet (the varnish would deepen and saturate the colours to make it look more like oils). In this study, I was aiming for a chiaroscuro effect through the contrast of highlights and shadows; this effect would also aid in its composition and singular subject matter:

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