Watercolour and summer

I wanted to post some summery images to offset the grim events of the fires and to cheer myself up. To me, summer is about sun and sea, and watercolours are great for light and colourful paintings. In this case, a small starfish painting on a piece of rag watercolour paper:

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The watercolour is decorated with white acrylic inks by Daler-Rowney, FW inks. They are very nice quality inks applied with a dip pen (the kind with holder and nib). I think I would have liked the nib to be finer in this case.

The decorated aquatic specimens are my way of celebrating and appreciating nature by observation and adornment.

Encaustic photo: Waxy Fern

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I’ve been experimenting as always and one thing led to another.

I decided to transfer my photographs onto a transparency film via laser printer. Then, I wondered how it would look encased in encaustic media. I used a piece of mat board and fused a couple of layers of encaustic medium. Next, I placed the film on top and added a couple of more layers and fused it as well. It gives the picture a bit more substance just by the thickness of it. I like the retro kind of look, the depth and the waxy sheen of the surface.

The only thing that I’m not too thrilled with is the archival factor. I’m kind of a stickler when it comes to archival quality in art works; I always use acid free papers and boards and the highest rated lightfast pigments in paints, etc. In the case of encaustic wax, the wax itself does serve as an isolation layer against acid but it does not do anything for pigments fading. While black toner from a laser printer is pretty good in maintaining ‘colour’ over time, coloured toner does not.

So a piece like this can still be enjoyed but is not a good example of long-lasting art.