Weird doodles

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Sometimes I just make some weird doodles. I don’t know where they come from or why but they just emerge, it’s the same with some faces I draw. Sometimes I’m embarrassed at the silly things that come out but I decided to post this image anyway for the very reason that I didn’t want to. In fact, this blog is very hard for me because I’m a very private and introverted person. However, I am trying to step outside of my comfort zone in order to connect with others through my art.

Figure Sketch

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Hello everyone, it’s been a while. Here’s a little sketch I did to brush up on figure drawing, which I haven’t done in a long, long time. It’s just astounding how skills get rusty and lost if not used regularly. I always thought it was like riding a bike, you do gain the ability back but, with much work and practice. It’s more like doing exercises to maintain fitness; it’s hard but you gotta do it to be healthy.

Winsor & Newton Pigment Marker: first impressions

I recently went to my local art supply store and saw a demo of these markers. While I don’t do a lot of marker work, I was excited by these markers because they are pigment based and are lightfast. So if you happen to do a great doodle, it would be frame worthy because of the quality pigments used instead of dye (which usually fades quite rapidly with exposure to light).

I was pleasantly surprised by the painterly quality you can achieve with these markers. When using marker paper, or in my case, Winsor and Newton marker paper, the pigments remain blendable for quite a while. You can rework it over and over again with a colourless blender or W&N white blender.

W&N white blender is semi-opaque. I have to say I love this blender. I haven’t come across a blender like this in marker form before. This blender and the marker paper is what allows to get the painterly effect. You can also can get so many tints of colour to achieve varied monochrome looks and stretch your palette as well.

Below are a couple of quick sketches:

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If you do any marker work at all, these are worth investing in.

Posca patterns

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In my last couple of posts, I was fooling around with Akashiya Sai brush pens. The pens produce transparent colours. This time, I wanted to try opaque colours on a black background. I think the effect is quite vibrant.

I used Strathmore artist tiles for the black paper and Posca paint markers for the coloured circles. Posca markers are made by the same people who make my favorite white pen, Mitsubishi Uni. The markers are water-based, odorless and opaque. They are fun to work with, the colours pop and produce a graphic look.

In this pattern, I used the white pens to accentuate the jellyfish look of the circles. I usually paint jellyfish motifs with transparent watercolours. It is interesting to illustrate them in this opaque manner as well. It kind of looks like an underwater nightscape.

In others news, I wanted you, my dear readers, to know that I will be on holidays until September. This holiday is long overdue and I am very excited to go. This will be my last post until then.

Wishing you a great summer!

Patterns II

The other day, I had a lot of fun making patterns. Today, I painted the same watercolour circles again, but this time I used white outlines instead of black ones:

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This change to white outlines does give the piece a different look and a lighter feel. The white was done using my favorite white pen, Mitsubishi Uni Signo. I found that the same patterns can look very different depending on lighting and colour.

Below are examples of my patterns after they have been put through different digital filters:

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There are so many different looks and possibilities!

Wishing you a great weekend.

Patterns

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I am sometimes inspired by patterns and illustrations. In this case, I was inspired by the patterns in the work of Lisa Congdon. Patterns are a great way of making creative marks when you don’t know what to depict. In a lot of cases, the motif develops naturally and it is often interesting to see what the final product turns out to be.

On my journal page in the picture above, I used my new favourite Akashiya Sai brush pen to paint the coloured circles. I used a waterbrush to dilute the coloured circles to have a watercolour look. For outlining and applying linear patterns, I used my trusty Sakura Pigma Microns. I like the contrast of the black lines in its many variations on the watercolour circles.

I think it’s interesting to see how many variations of patterns you can come up with. I was exploring the circular-segmented motif that seems to look floral. I like the overall look of the patterns that make-up the big picture. It is bright, colourful and whimsical but it also has a bit of edge from the black lines.

Next time you don’t know what to draw, try a pattern.

Akashiya Sai

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I think I mentioned before how strongly I feel about using archival art materials. I usually use only acid-free, better yet lignin-free, and lightfast art making supplies.

The only exception so far is Akashiya Sai brush pens. These Japanese dye-based coloured pens have synthetic brush ends that are finer and more supple than regular waterbrushes. They are also a dream to work with. They blend with water so easily and the colours are so beautiful, vibrant and transparent. I mentioned them before but I had to bring them up again because they are sooo nice to work with.

Since they are not archival (the colours will fade with light), I use them only in journal pages or doodles that will not be sold or displayed:
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If you like watercolour effects in a brush pen and do not need something archival, give these pens a try. You can find them at Jetpens and other online stores like Amazon.

Wishing you a lovely weekend.

P.S. I can never remember how to spell the name of these pens. 😆

Journal page with Golden High Flow

Lately, it’s been hot. I don’t know about you, but I don’t like to do much when it’s hot. So I’ve been just fooling around with my journal pages.

I’ve been trying Golden acrylics again. I don’t know why, but the Heavy Body and the Fluid ranges of the Golden acrylics underwhelm me. But the High Flow and the Open ranges I like quite a bit. The random blobs were done with the Golden High Flow ‘Drawing’ set:

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The paint was squiggled on and sprayed with water. The paints are pretty much acrylic inks and I love the applicator bottles they come in. It’s much easier to get small amounts of paint and also easier to transfer into other bottles if you need to.

The High Flow ‘Drawing’ set comes with a nice assortment of colours including three metallics: gold, copper and silver. They are quite fun but needs to be shaken vigorously like many liquid metallic paints.

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I decided to add a little doodle with my favorite white pen, Uniball Signo. This time I was able to get more of the thinner version that I was out of.

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Wishing you a wonderfully balmy summer weekend!