Traditional painting in “Experiments” series

Hi everyone, below is a study in the “Experiments” series:
image
I decided to use the traditional painting method of glazing with acrylic paint. The study features a basic sphere rendered by building-up transparent layers. I wanted to see what it would look like with a treatment of modern acrylic medium on top of it.

Here is a detail of the tonal values rendered on the sphere using the glazing technique. The good thing about glazing with acrylics is how fast it dries. You can get many thin layers down in a day. Whereas, in traditional oil painting, you’re lucky if you can get one layer done:
image

I really like the rough texture of the burnt umber:
image

I like the way the rough texture wraps around the sides of the painting. It makes the image more congruous as a whole:
image

Here is another detail:
image

Thanks for stopping by. I hope you’re enjoying the fall weather and it’s colours.

Straight forward experiment

Here is another painting in my “Experiments” series:
image
In this piece I’ve painted a very simple abstract motif in the shape if a wave with a high impasto arch:
imageI used a warm and high-chroma orange to contrast cooler colours in the background.

The wave motif central to the piece is reinforced by the water droplets:
image

All in all, I wanted to see how the pouring medium would affect a typical acrylic abstract painting just by coating it. Here is a view of the side painted with silver:
image
It seems that the pouting medium doesn’t add anything but a high gloss finish to the painting. Although the gloss has more dimension so it looks more like a clear coating rather than just a painting with high sheen level. It’s a subtle difference but one to take note of.

“Experiments” series cont..2

Hi everybody, here’s another piece from the “Experiments” series:
image
In this piece I used an old watercolour snippet of a face I had lying around. I adhered it to canvas and used pouring medium over it:
image
After the pouring medium encased the watercolour, I used micaceous iron oxide to “shade” around the watercolour to “frame” it like a vignette along with some magenta. The magenta is then used to obscure the eyes, accentuate lips and define the outline of the head. More layers of pouring medium is applied on top with various shades of teal that remind me of bronze patina. Finally, striations of gold and silver are added to breakup the image:
imageThe black bits are fragments of micaceous iron oxide.

The piece is interesting to me because of the colour combinations and patterns. Also, the juxtaposition of the traditional-figurative against abstract motifs. The traditional elemet is a watercolour of a woman’s head, the fluid application of the magenta versus the abstract elements of rectilinear metallic lines, and even the gloss of the medium itself.

Here’s a side shot:
image
I’m learning quite a bit about what this pouring medium can do. And I’m finding that it is really versatile.

“Experiments” Continued…

Below is a mixed media piece in my pouring medium “Experiments” series:
image
This piece features wool and watercolour sticks. The hairy under layer is actually blue-black wool roving. I used it in a way that provides a gradient-look by thinning out the hairs from bottom up. I find that it complements the blue-black tint in the watercolour stick background drawing:
imageThe amber-like forms on the bottom of the canvas are translucent and you can see the hairs through them. These also emit iridescent dots of bronze and fiery copper that also fade out towards the top of the painting.

The white cloud-like forms are built up in layers to resemble porcelain. It reminds me of blue and white china:
image

Here’s a view from the side:
image
I think these micro-scapes can be something from an alien-world or ours if you look closely enough.  I hope you like it.

Another Painting from the “Experiments” Series

Here’s my latest finished piece from the “Experiments” series:
image
I say “finished” because I find myself working on several pieces at once. This is because I work on other pieces while some layers are drying. Anyhoo, this piece is mixed media that includes metallic thread and glass.

Here is a close up of the metallic threads:
image It’s unfortunate I was not able to show very well, the magenta reflection of the threads.

 
Here’s the closeup of the glass cabochon used to highlight my initial:
image
The blackish circles are interesting because they’re made with micaceous iron oxide. They have the texture of sandpaper, kind of like iron shavings suspended in polymer emulsion.

The background of the piece was done with black scribbles of acrylic paint. I wanted to express movement and dynamism:
image

Overall, I was pleased with the painting. I like the colours being strong and contrasting (black and magenta) while maintaining a softness. The softness is achieved by the thinning down of high chroma magenta variegated with alizarin crimson.

“Experiments” Series

As you know I’ve been working with pouring mediums lately. I’ve decided to group most of these paintings that share the same form factor (4″x4″ on canvas) into a series called “Experiments”. Because they are experimental in nature, these pieces primarily focus on exploring pouring medium with other media. Below is the latest one (again, please excuse the glare, they are difficult to photograph):
image
In this painting I incorporated glass beads. I love the look of the beads in this piece since the beads obviously lend themselves to bubbles in water.:
image

Some of the beads are iridescent to compliment the shifting hues when light reflects off the water when it moves:
image

Another fun thing was to put a flat glass piece over my initial, providing a see-through feature like a window:
image

Below is a shot showing the sides of the deep-edge canvas with drippage:
image

I have to say I really enjoy making these pieces because they are explorative and fun. I hope you enjoy them too.

“Harmony” or “The Birthday Party”


image

Above is a pouring medium piece called “Harmony”. I wanted to illustrate uniquely different elements in harmony. In this case, three primary colours rendered in simple, soft, curvy shapes.

I wanted to convey nature in primitive or fundamental form, depicted in harmony. I chose to illustrate the forms by way of the “amoeba”-like shapes. In order to stress the “building blocks of life” feel, I alluded to biological, microscopic and chemical elements in the white “chemical notation” markings:

image
I wanted the larger forms in the background to be soft and muted; I wanted the smaller forms coming into focus in the foreground, to be clear, bright and vibrant. The feeling I wanted was to be reminiscent of those macro videos of biological functions of cells etc.. you know the ones right?

image

I chose to expose the look of the bare wood on the sides to complement the soft background:

image

I’m happy with the way this piece turned out. Along with the biological and chemical motifs of this piece, I especially like the minimal look and whimsical feeling.

Despite my intentions for this piece though, when I showed this to my son, he said it reminded him of a birthday party. Everyone takes away something unique to them.🙃

Box

A little while ago, my friend commented on Facebook about my poured medium pieces and brought up jewelry boxes. At the time, I happened to be working on a wooden box decorated with Tar Gel and pouring medium:
imageI decided on black and gold. I liked how the lid looked with its swirls.

The bottom portion of the box is done with different motifs:
image

I didn’t put the hinges back on yet but I wanted to show you the gold interior:
image
It’s a bit of work to paint 3D objects, since your limited to working on a few sides at a time until other sides dry. But it was a fun little project.

Hey, Hokusai

This is a piece I did using pouring medium and pastel, it’s called “Hey, Hokusai”:
image
Something about it reminded me of the “The Great Wave off Kanagawa” by Katsushika Hokusai. Although the only thing in common are the waves: image somehow it reminded me of the Hokusai painting when I painted it.

The thing I like most is the background; it is composed of gesso applied thickly and pan pastel applied overtop. The gesso adds a nice texture to which the pastels can embed its pigments: image
The rustic look of the background is contrasted by the glossy, modern-looking pop of the sun:
image

All in all, I’m pleased with the way this one turned out since it was only an experiment. I hope you like it too.
image

Tar Gel and Pouring Medium

I was experimenting with Golden’s Tar Gel and it’s usability with Liquitex Pouring Medium. The piece below, is called “Forest of the Fireflies”:
image
The clear stringy texture in the background is made with the tar gel. The gold strings are made with gold paint added to the tar gel. I really like the look and feel of the “string gel”; string gel is another name for Tar Gel because of its stringiness or technically called, rheology. You can get neat effects when you take a palette knife and let the gel fall or drip onto the substrate.

I found that the tar gel works well enough with the pouring medium. In this piece, pouring medium covers the whole piece. However, there are a few things I don’t like about the tar gel. One is the how easily it tends to get air bubbles when you mix in the pigment or paint. You have to do it very slowly, I suppose you can pre-mix it and let it sit for a day but I’m impatient. Another thing that I don’t like is that it’s really difficult to handle for instance, putting it in small squirt bottles which I like to do. It’s not much of a problem if you put it in larger jars but there tends to be a lot of waste and spillage etc..think of it as handling liquid honey. Finally, I really don’t like its tackiness, it takes a while to fully cure.

I’m glad I got to find out how the tar gel behaves with the pouring medium. I’ll file the data in my head and remember it’s qualities for future use. Meanwhile, I’m happy that this image of fireflies that was lodged in my brain, for quite a while, came out.